Griffin’s Cure
J.C. Paulson / 22 September 2020

Griffin’s Cureby J.C. PaulsonPublished by Joanne PaulsonReview by Michelle Shaw$20 ISBN 9780995975668 A brilliant scientist lies dead in his laboratory at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan. There is no bullet wound, no stab wound, no sign of blunt force trauma. In fact, no obvious cause of death. Yet he was clearly murdered. This is the fourth book in J.C. Paulson’s Adam and Grace romantic suspense series and Paulson really does get better with each book. The plot in Griffin’s Cure revolves around a unique mushroom with unusual healing powers and a brilliant young University of Saskatchewan student Jay Griffin. There’s lots of action (romantic and otherwise) as Detective Sergeant Adam Davis of the Saskatoon Police and StarPhoenix reporter Grace Rampling desperately try to figure out who killed Dr Taras Petrenko before more people are murdered. Once again Paulson sets her story in Saskatoon, this time primarily at the University of Saskatchewan. The Departments of Agriculture and Dentistry feature prominently, a police officer goes undercover as a student and there’s lots of intrigue among academic staff and students. For a little international flair, there’s even a Prague connection. Timewise this book occurs shortly after the previous…

Adam’s Witness
J.C. Paulson / 9 January 2019

Adam’s Witness by J. C. Paulson Published by Joanne Paulson Review by Shelley A. Leedahl $18ftenace and her feisty loving .99 ISBN 9-780995-975606 Adam’s Witness is longtime Saskatoon StarPhoenix journalist Joanne Paulson’s first foray into fiction, and the part mystery, part romance novel set in Saskatoon is sure to gain her many fans. The fast-paced story begins with diligent StarPhoenix reporter Grace Rampling receiving a phone call from Pride Chorus member Bruce, who’s upset that his choir’s next-day concert at St. Eligius Catholic Church was suddenly and inexplicably cancelled. Rampling crosses the alley to the nearby cathedral to learn why, and in the dark sanctuary she stumbles upon “a man in clerical clothing right at her feet” who is “bleeding copiously from the head”. The bishop’s been murdered, and all hell breaks loose. Could the perpetrator be a bitter choir member? A parishioner? Someone within the church? We learn that “the monstrance is missing,” and this large sacred vessel (it contains the Host) could, ironically, be the murder weapon. What makes this book work so well is Paulson’s smart handling of diverse, well-drawn characters, and a two-pronged plot: not only is mid-twenties Grace the key witness (she’ll also come under…