Ten Little Ladybugs in My Jar/My Mummy Couldn’t Read
See A Book Take A Look / 25 June 2008

Ten Little Ladybugs in My Jar $9.99 ISBN 0-9781874-0-7 and My Mummy Couldn’t Read $9.99 ISBN 978-0-9781874-1-5 by Carey Rigby-Wilcox Published by See A Book Take A Look Review by Sharon Adam These two delightful children’s books are fun to read and the author’s illustrations add to the enjoyment of the stories. There are lessons in both books for children and adults alike. In Ten Little Ladybugs in My Jar, the author shows that when you allow the ladybugs the choice to stay or go, they may leave, but they may also come back. This is a life lesson that many adults need to learn as well as children. In My Mummy Couldn’t Read, we share the author’s own story of her struggle to learn to read. She was determined to overcome the barrier of illiteracy and with the help of a tutor, mastered reading and went on to publish these two books. Ms. Rigby-Wilcox is a self-taught artist as well as a writer. These titles are part of a series that the author is working on to encourage others who may have experienced the same obstacles in their journey to read. Through her own experience she shares the rewards…

Frontier Farwell

Frontier Farewell. The 1870s and the End of the Old West by Garrett Wilson Published by University of Regina Reviewed by Tim Tokaryk $19.95 ISBN 978-0-88977-193-2 The hoof prints have long since gone. The imprinted sand and clays quickly re-shaped by time, returned to a landscape dominated by natural grasses and sagebrush. But in cluttered archives and journal scrawlings their imprint remains. The impressions, ideas, hopes, and simple need for survival of the people of Canada’s West are newly amalgamated in Garrett Wilson’s Frontier Farewell, The 1870s and the End of the Old West. In this heavily researched volume, Wilson suggests that this period was pivotal to the shaping of the prairies and Canada as a nation. The Dominion of Canada, fearful of annexation by U.S. expansionismwas incensed in the marking of its territory, particularly along the seemingly arbitrary line of the 49th parallel: a line that didn’t follow any topographical relief or structure, a line determined in a country across an ocean. Despite what was decided in the mother land thousands of kilometers away or in the nation’s eastern capital, which seemed like another world in and of itself, the reality of determining the right course of action had…

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